Tag Archives: Resurfacing

When Close Enough Isn’t Close Enough

Recently, a local builder contacted us. They were working on a large addition and had some problems with the floors. The main floor of the original house had radiant heat and the architect and designer had specified a micro-topping installed as the finish floor. The house had since sold and the new owners liked the floors and wanted something similar for their addition. Somehow, they decided a gypcrete product was a close enough match??? The original color of the gypcrete was a fairly close match, but as it was finished and sealed, several black aggregate pieces began to stand out on the light colored floor. The client wasn’t happy with the black specs, but would have let it slide. A short time later, however, the floor began to develop cracks over the radiant heat coils and now something had to be done.

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Making Tire Tracks Disappear: How We Saved a Driveway

A few weeks after your new driveway is poured a winter blizzard hits.  You live on a hill and the roads are terrible.  You have to get out so you chain up.   Your adventure concluded, you arrive back home only to have difficulty making it up the slope into your garage.  Your car fish-tales a bit and your tires spin but you make it into the garage with a sigh of relief.  Everything is great until the snow melts a few days later and you notice dark tire tracks up the driveway and into the garage.  Unfortunately these aren’t ordinary tire tracks.  These are where you tire chains ground into the surface of the fresh concrete.  No amount of washing or scrubbing will do anything to make them better.  The actual finish on the concrete is gone.  To make matters worse, you live at the top of a small hill on a bend in the road so everyone driving up the hill can’t help but stare at your newly desecrated driveway.  It is right in front of them and it is impossible to miss.

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How Not to Repair Stamped Concrete

After the dark days of winter in Seattle, (and by winter, I mean October through June) Seattleites want to get out and enjoy summer, which is usually confined to the months of August and September, as July can be hit or miss weather-wise and is basically considered ‘fall.’ Patios, particularly ones finished with stamped concrete tend to be covered in lots of mildew and grime that has settled into all the low spots with the help of all the rain, and has essentially turned into its own form of concrete once dried out by the sun. With newer stamped concrete, pressure washing will remove this and bring back that beautiful color you desired when you chose decorative concrete in the first place. In other cases, the weather and wear may have taken its toll and the beauty is gone. So lets talk about what not to do.

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