Making Tire Tracks Disappear: How We Saved a Driveway

Tire Tracks Ground into a New Driveway

Tire Tracks Ground into a New Driveway

A few weeks after your new driveway is poured a winter blizzard hits.  You live on a hill and the roads are terrible.  You have to get out so you chain up.   Your adventure concluded, you arrive back home only to have difficulty making it up the slope into your garage.  Your car fish-tales a bit and your tires spin but you make it into the garage with a sigh of relief.  Everything is great until the snow melts a few days later and you notice dark tire tracks up the driveway and into the garage.  Unfortunately these aren’t ordinary tire tracks.  These are where you tire chains ground into the surface of the fresh concrete.  No amount of washing or scrubbing will do anything to make them better.  The actual finish on the concrete is gone.  To make matters worse, you live at the top of a small hill on a bend in the road so everyone driving up the hill can’t help but stare at your newly desecrated driveway.  It is right in front of them and it is impossible to miss.

 

Tire Chains Ground Away the Broom Finish on this New Driveway

Tire Chains Ground Away the Broom Finish on this New Driveway

This client called us and was still sick to his stomach in the spring after ruining his new driveway in the winter while it was only a few weeks old.  He didn’t expect much, and was sure his only option was to tear it out and replace it.  As he told us what had happened and we inspected the damage, we came up with a plan to save the driveway without having to replace it.  Most of the damage amounted to discoloration where a small amount of the surface concrete was removed leaving the dark tire tracks.  On the steepest section of the drive however, the broom finish surface was completely ground off by the spinning tires and chains. 

 

A Broomed Overlay Repairs the Damage

A Broom Finish Overlay Repairs Some of the Damage

We proposed resurfacing the bad section with a broomed overlay to get the texture back.  The problem with this, is that it is nearly impossible to match the color of existing concrete with an overlay, and we would still be left with dark tire tracks on the lower parts of the driveway where the broom finish was still intact, but heavily discolored.  To resolve this, we proposed a spray-on concrete micro-topping over the entire driveway to get it to a uniform color.   We would then seal the entire surface.  I won’t say the client was excited about the cost, but we were substantially less than the cost of replacement, and he was excited about that!

 

Spray-on Concrete Resurfacer Recolors this Driveway

Spray-on Concrete Resurfacer Recolors this Driveway

The project took three days to complete and when we were done the driveway looked like new again.

 

 


The Sealer Drying on this Repaired Driveway

The Sealer Drying on this Repaired Driveway

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2 Responses to Making Tire Tracks Disappear: How We Saved a Driveway

  1. Jordan Mast August 31, 2014 at 6:19 pm

    Hi, I live in northern Indiana and and I am wondering what the spray on micro topping was that you used? Do you spray it on and then run a finish broom over it? Thanks

  2. admin August 31, 2014 at 10:33 pm

    Jordan,

    The spray on micro-topping used was Spray-Top by Concrete Solutions. We did a standard broom overlay on the really bad section and used Spray-Top to get a uniform color over the entire surface.

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